Two-time AL Cy Young winner Corey Kluber could be done for the season after only one inning for the Texas Rangers.

He has a tear in a small muscle in his right shoulder that won’t require surgery, but even in the best-case scenario in this shortened season he won’t throw again for at least four weeks, which is when he will be evaluated again.

“It’s a blow, there’s no getting around it,” said Jon Daniels, the team president and general manager.

Daniels said Monday an MRI revealed a grade 2 tear. The 34-year-old right-hander will receive a platelet-rich plasma injection this week.

“Given the time frame here and the nature of a 60-game schedule and everything that goes with it, the timeline is not on our side,” Daniels said. “We will give him his period to rest, and then if it’s recovered, or the injury is healed to the point where he can begin throwing, he’ll do so with the potential to possibly be ready for the end of the season. If that is the case, it’d probably be more likely as a reliever, given the time needed to build up as a starter.”

The Rangers didn’t immediately make a roster move Monday since they had the day off, but Kluber is headed to the injured list. Daniels said young left-hander Kolby Allard, who is already on the 30-man roster after nine starts as a rookie last season, will fill Kluber’s spot in the rotation.

Kluber exited Sunday’s home game against Colorado after one scoreless inning with tightness behind his shoulder. It was his first start in the majors since May 1, 2019, when he broke his right forearm on a liner to the mound. He injured his side during rehab last summer.

The Rangers acquired Kluber in a trade from Cleveland in December, adding him to a rotation with All-Star left-hander Mike Minor and hard-throwing veteran Lance Lynn.

PRO BASKETBALL

NEW YORK —Kyrie Irving is making sure WNBA players can sit out the season and not stress about a paycheck.

The Brooklyn Nets star is committing $1.5 million to supplement the income of players who choose not to play this season, whether it be because of coronavirus concerns or social justice reasons.

The funds will come from the KAI Empowerment Initiative that Irving launched Monday. It will also provide players with a financial literacy program created by UBS.

Irving said that with the help of WNBA players Natasha Cloud—who chose to sit out—and Jewell Loyd, he connected with several WNBA players who discussed with him the challenges they faced in deciding whether to play.