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Rosalia Tejeda, second from left, plays with her children, from left, son Juscianni Blackeller, 13; Adaliana Gray, 5, and Audrey Gray, 2, in their backyard in Arlington, Texas, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. As Tejeda, 38, has learned more about health risks posed by fracking for natural gas, she has become a vocal opponent of a plan to add more natural gas wells at a site near her home. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

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Wanda Vincent prepares to check the temperature of 2-year-old Olivia Grace Charles, who holds the hand of her mother, Guerda Philemond, outside the Mother's Heart Learning Center in Arlington, Texas, on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. Philemond is worried about a proposal to add three new gas wells at a drill site that's a few hundred feet from the day care and several residences. The fracking site is operated by TEP Barnett, a subsidiary of French energy giant Total Energies. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

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A staff member at the Mother's Heart Learning Center, in background, opens a door to let children inside from the center's playground in Arlington, Texas, on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. The fracking pond in the foreground is part of a natural gas drill site, known as "AC-360," a few hundred feet from the daycare. The site is operated by TEP Barnett, a subsidiary of French energy giant Total Energies. It is one of Total's 33 well sites in Arlington containing 163 natural gas wells, most of them tucked in urban neighborhoods in Arlington. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

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Frank and Michelle Meeks stand in their backyard in Arlington, Texas, on Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021, with a fracking site, hidden by "sound walls," looming behind them. The site, called "Rocking Horse," is operated by TEP Barnett, a subsidiary of French energy giant Total Energies and is just a few hundred feet from their home. Beyond concerns about long-term health risks posed by fracking, the Meeks say they've endured frequent drilling noise and vibration in recent months. They and other neighbors also say the drilling has damaged their homes' foundations. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

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Wanda Vincent sheds a tear on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021, during an interview at the Mother's Heart Learning Center in Arlington, Texas. Vincent, who owns the day care, is upset about a proposal to add natural gas wells at a nearby fracking site that's operated by TEP Barnett, a subsidiary of French energy giant Total Energies. The proposal, which was rejected last year during nationwide Black Lives Matter protests, got initial approval from the city's planning commission in October, despite continued opposition from Vincent, parents and residents in the neighborhood. They worry about long- and short-term impacts of drilling, particularly on the children in the community. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

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Pamela Polk sits next to the home she rents in Arlington, Texas, on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. A TEP Barnett fracking site, hidden by the fence and trees behind her, sits just a few hundred feet from the house and those of her neighbors, most of them also renters. TEP Barnett is a subsidiary of French energy giant Total Energies. Polk has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and, since moving in a decade ago, said her grandson has developed asthma. She worries that the well site has had an impact on their health. "I'm frustrated," she said. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)