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FILE - Medical staff and volunteers prepare shots of the COVID-19 vaccine a vaccination center in Ramsgate, England, Thursday, Dec. 16, 2021. On Friday, Jan. 21, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly claiming a photo of a poster distributed by the National Health Service in England warning that COVID-19 vaccines cause Bell’s palsy.(Leon Neal, Pool via AP)

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FILE - A dose of a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is prepared at Lurie Children's hospital, Nov. 5, 2021, in Chicago. Three new U.S. studies offer more evidence that the COVID-19 vaccines are standing up to the omicron variant, at least among people who have received booster shots. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the studies, Friday. Jan. 21, 2022. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

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Roger Strukhoff 67, poses for a portrait Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022, in his DeKalb, Ill., home. Strukhoff was being treated for intestinal bleeding at a hospital outside Chicago this month when he suffered a mild heart attack. Normally, the medical staff would have sent Strukhoff to the intensive care unit, but, overrun with COVID-19 patients, the staff instead had to wheel a heart monitor into his room and quickly administer nitroglycerin and morphine. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

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Roger Strukhoff 67, poses for a portrait Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022, in his DeKalb, Ill., home. Strukhoff was being treated for intestinal bleeding at a hospital outside Chicago this month when he suffered a mild heart attack. Normally, the medical staff would have sent Strukhoff to the intensive care unit, but, overrun with COVID-19 patients, the staff instead had to wheel a heart monitor into his room and quickly administer nitroglycerin and morphine. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

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Roger Strukhoff 67, poses for a portrait Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022, in his DeKalb, Ill., home. Strukhoff was being treated for intestinal bleeding at a hospital outside Chicago this month when he suffered a mild heart attack. Normally, the medical staff would have sent Strukhoff to the intensive care unit, but, overrun with COVID-19 patients, the staff instead had to wheel a heart monitor into his room and quickly administer nitroglycerin and morphine. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • Updated

Roger Strukhoff 67, poses for a portrait Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022, in his DeKalb, Ill., home. Strukhoff was being treated for intestinal bleeding at a hospital outside Chicago this month when he suffered a mild heart attack. Normally, the medical staff would have sent Strukhoff to the intensive care unit, but, overrun with COVID-19 patients, the staff instead had to wheel a heart monitor into his room and quickly administer nitroglycerin and morphine. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)